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Easter Egg Safety
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Boiled Easter Egg Safety

  • Refrigerate eggs at 45 degrees until needed.
  • Discard cracked or dirty eggs
  • Both the inside of the egg and the outside shell may have salmonella germs. Wash your hands with warm water and soap and any hard surfaces thoroughly before and after contact with the shell or raw eggs including cooking, cooling, dyeing, and hiding.
  • Eggs should be cooked until BOTH the white and yolk are firmly set. Despite a popular myth, the yolk can also be contaminated with salmonella.
  • Do not keep eggs at room temperature longer than two hours.
  • Refrigerate the eggs before dyeing them.
  • Hard-cooked eggs spoil faster than fresh eggs. Boiling removes the protective coating. Do not keep unshelled hard-cooked eggs in your refrigerator longer than seven days.
  • Peeled hard-cooked eggs should be eaten within 24 hours.
  • It is best not to eat the eggs you hide.
  • A green ring around the yolk isn’t harmful. It shows the egg was overcooked.

Source:

Eggs for Easter: Great Food But Handle Safely

Safety of hard-cooked eggs for dyeing | UMN Extension

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Guidelines for handling boiled eggs. Use safe egg handling techniques to prevent illness.

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